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Whether you are cooking for yourself or your dog, knowing your way around the kitchen is essential. You are never too young to start learning — and how much fun is it to cook for your dog?!

This dog biscuit recipe is from Stir It Up! Recipes and Techniques for Young Blind Cooks, from National Braille Press.

Be Safe — Not Sorry!

Follow these rules to the letter when you set foot in the kitchen!

Doggie Paws Recipe

What You'll Need

Ingredients


Tips for the Grownup Helpers

This might be a good moment to talk about foods you should NOT give a dog, which include:

Measuring Dry Ingredients

It's easiest to measure flour and other dry ingredients from a large canister rather than from a bag.

To measure spices, take the cover off so you can explore the size and type of openings. For most spices, it should be possible to dip the measuring spoon directly into the can or bottle and level it off.

Measuring Liquids

When pouring liquids, work over a pie pan or cookie sheet to capture any spills. Pour the liquid into the cup with one hand, while touching the rim of the measuring cup with the index finger of the other hand. When you feel the liquid hit the top, stop. If you cook a lot, transfer often-used liquids, such as vanilla or canola oil, into larger glass containers into which you can dip the measuring spoons.

Kneading Dough

Lightly scatter flour on a table or countertop and place the dough mixture on it. If the dough mixture is very moist or sticky, sprinkle additional flour over the top. Gather the dough into a pile and press it together with both hands. Press the heels of your hands firmly into the center of the pile of dough, pushing down and slightly forward. Then reach for the far edge of the dough (at twelve o'clock) and fold it over, toward you. Press down and forward, again, in the middle. Rotate the pile of dough slightly and repeat: press-fold-turn several times.

Spraying a Cookie Sheet with Cooking Oil

Place the cookie sheet inside the sink to contain any over-exuberant spraying. Move horizontally across the pan in a zigzag pattern from top to bottom.


This activity was adapted from Stir It Up! Recipes and Techniques for Young Blind Cooks.

OBJECTIVES


You'll learn how to:

  • Spray or grease a cookie sheet
  • Measure ingredients
  • Knead dough
  • Shape cookies
  • Make gifts for the neighborhood dogs!

Pro Tip!

To measure sticky ingredients, like peanut butter, it may be helpful to use a rubber spatula.

photo of a bowl of peanut butter sitting on peanuts

Tools of the Trade

There are a lot of cooking items and accessories made especially for blind cooks. Here are some of our favorites!

Measuring Cups & Spoons
Sets of plastic cups and spoons marked in raised print and braille!

measuring cups


Talking Food Thermometer
Make sure your meat is properly cooked with this talking, probe-style thermometer from LS&S Products.

Talking Food Thermometer


Whisks, Oven Mitts, & Cookie Cutters
A cute combo from Growing Cooks: A real, kid-sized oven mitt, with a cookie cutter and wire whisk.

four kids wearing the different-colored aprons and mitts
Photo of a red tomato and green avocado

If you want more practice cooking, check out how to make tacos for a taco party!

Book cover for Stir It Up!

Stir It Up! Recipes & Techniques for Young Blind Cooks was created especially for young blind children to get started in the kitchen!



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