National Braille Press Home Page        Great Expectations        Children's Braille Book Club        Our Bookstore        Kid's Programs
Line to separating menu bar from content

Great Expectations logo, shows a girl and dog flying on a giant braille book
Make a Donation


Don't want to accidentally pay $20 for a $5 ice cream? Use your sense of touch to tell different coins apart and learn folding techniques to keep track of your different paper bills.

Common Coins

The four most common coins are the penny, nickel, dime, and quarter. They are each worth different amounts of money and have different physical traits you can use to tell them apart through touch.

The value of each coin is:


How to tell coins apart without looking:

Keeping these facts in mind, grab a whole bunch of coins and take a shot at these fun games!


Different Ways to Make a Dollar

A dollar is worth 100 cents. Using only pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters, there are many different ways to make a dollar. Let's have some fun with different combinations.


Can you make a dollar using only one type of coin?

    Answer: 100 pennies, 20 nickels, 10 dimes, or 4 quarters; each = 1 dollar.


Can you make a dollar using only 7 coins?

    Answer: 2 quarters + 5 dimes = 1 dollar.


Can you make a dollar using only 15 coins?

    Answer: 10 nickels + 5 dimes = 1 dollar.


Using more than one type of coin, what is the smallest number of coins you can use to make a dollar?

    Answer: Six coins: 3 quarters + 2 dimes + 1 nickel = 1 dollar.


Using more than one type of coin, what is the largest number of coins you can use to make a dollar?

    Answer: 96 coins: 95 pennies + 1 nickel = 1 dollar.



Matching Amounts

Have one person think of an amount of money and another person make that amount using only pennies, nickels, dimes, and quarters. If playing with a group, see who can make the amount first!


How Much Am I?

Read the riddles and lay out the coins that you think solve the riddle.


I am 2 coins and am worth less than 15 cents but more than 10 cents. What am I?

    Answer: 1 dime and 1 penny


I am 6 coins and am worth less than 25 cents. What am I?

    Answer: 2 dimes and 4 pennies


I am 3 coins and am worth less than 10 cents. What am I?

    Answer: 1 nickel and 2 pennies



This activity was created by Lisamaria Martinez and Kesel Wilson for Great Expectations.



Folding Paper Money

shows several ways to fold bills.

You can fold paper money to tell the bills apart by touch. There is no right or wrong way to do it, but here is one method:

  • Leave your $1 bills unfolded.
  • Fold your $5 bills like a hamburger roll (short ends together).
  • Fold your $10 bills like a hotdog roll (long ends together).
  • Fold your $20 bills first like a hamburger roll and then like a hotdog roll.

Money and Technology

From the simple to the high tech, there are tools out there to help you identify your money.

photo of the Click Pocket Money Brailler.

Click Pocket Money Brailler
Insert the edge of a bill into this tool and squeeze it to mark the amount on the bill in braille.

photo of the iBill Talking Banknote Identifier.

iBill Talking Banknote Identifier
This small tool will identify your bills and announce the amount by voice, tone, or vibration.

photo of the LookTel Money Reader.

LookTel Money Reader
This iOS app lets you point your phone's camera at a bill to hear the amount in real time.

Who is Connor McLeod?

Connor McLeod on stage at the 2015 NBP Gala.

Connor McLeod is a blind teenager in Australia who wouldn't take no for an answer. After getting money for Christmas and not being able to tell how much he had been given, he started a nationwide campaign to make Australia's money truly accessible. Now, the Reserve Bank of Australia will be adding tactile elements to its banknotes so that all of its citizens will be able to identify their money independently!



National Braille Press Logo                  CONTACT US                  Bridge Multimedia Logo